Miracle Mineral Supplement Scam

English: Logo of the .
English: Logo of the . (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Is Miracle Mineral Supplement Scam?

Even when medical science is on its way to the zenith, many ordinary people are still utterly mislead by various frauds and scams that sweep over the community every once in a while. Most of these are related to health and nutrition, and may often be wrapped in convincing terms like ‘nature’s gifts’ and ‘secret recipes’. One such scam is Miracle Mineral Supplement, MMS in short, which has spread to various parts of the world including Canada, Australia and even Africa. The available evidence is more than sufficient to classify it not only as a scam, but as a serious threat to public health.

MMS, also called Miracle Mineral Solution, was first referred to in the book ‘The Miracle Mineral Solution of the 21st Century’ published by Jim Humble in 2006. Parallel to this, many anecdotal reports showed up, claiming that MMS was a magical product that could cure a variety of diseases like malaria, hepatitis, common colds, H1N1 flu and even HIV and cancer. In fact, MMS is a solution of 28 percent sodium chlorite in distilled water. According to manufacturers, it was necessary to ‘activate’ MMS with some sort of food acid like citric acid before use.

As far as chemistry is concerned, MMS is not much different from industrial bleach. Sodium chlorite, when combined with an acid, produces chlorine dioxide. In reality, this is nothing other than a bleaching agent used for stripping textiles and industrial water treatment. Its oral consumption can obviously lead to serious health issues, as it’s a severe respiratory and eye irritant. If you are lucky, you’ll get away with minor symptoms like stomach pain, vomiting and diarrhea, which are commonly associated with corrosive damage. Other potential risks include reproductive and neurological damages, in addition to dangerously low blood pressures. A larger dose or long-term use is known to reduce the red blood cell count in blood, leading to respiratory arrest and eventual death. Sodium chlorite itself is toxic and may result in fatal kidney failure.

In 2009, an American woman who took MMS against malaria while in Vanuatu fell ill in 15 minutes and died within 12 hours. A Canadian man had to be hospitalized with lethal responses to MMS in 2008. With such incidents, many healthcare professionals started digging into MMS, and came up with shocking results. As a result, public health institutes of many countries, including the US FDA, the UK Food Standards Agency and the Belgian Poison Control Centre issued warnings against MMS. The FDA even advised those who have started using MMS to dispose of the product immediately.

Legal action has been taken against many vendors and promoters of MMS. Yet, the Miracle Mineral Solution scam revives in many parts of the world. Unfortunately, MMS has found its way into Africa, a vast land with less educated people who would soon become desperate victims of this lethal substance. So it’s time for everyone to get together to wipe off MMS from the face of the earth and duly punish the ‘criminals’ behind it.

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Adya Clarity Scam

 

English: ions in solution of hydrochloric acid...
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Have you heard of the Adya Clarity Scam and the Black Mica products? If you do, it is most likely that you are still wondering whether this is a genuine product or one of the many scams being witnessed in the market today. These concerns are quite genuine simply because anything to do with your health must be carefully considered as you cannot afford subjecting your body to random experiments with every other product that is introduced into the market. As such, it is very important that careful consideration is taken before anyone commits to any health and wellness product to avoid consequences that will be regretted and could even be fatal in some instances.

One thing that draws the attention of most people concerning the Black Mica products and the larger Adya Clarity Scam is the hype and amazing claims that its sellers put across. You might want to test the product yourself, especially when you see the videos posted all over YouTube and other online forums, but the words used to describe this offer make you pose for a second and take further analysis of the Adya Clarity Scam. You will encounter one video in particular which shows a dropper full of the magnetic sulfate mineral solution of the Black Mica product being put into a glass of water which is fetched from the tap. Immediately the solution mixes with the tap water it starts attracting substances from the water which you will be told are toxins and other contaminants present in tap water. For a short while, the solution gathers these substances and they form large particles which sink to the bottom of the glass.

The resulting message from this experiment is more of marketing oriented than one which seeks to offer a scientific proof to the entire process in its whole. However, major players behind the Adya Clarity Scam confirm that the Black Mica product was an invention of one Dr. Asao Shimanishi who discovered that the Black Mica rock or Biotite had immense healing powers. In fact, this scholar from Japan alludes to the idea of cleaning entire water bodies such as lakes and rivers using this solution.

A closer look at the Adya Clarity Scam indicates that Dr. Asao Shimanishi would use Hydrochloric acid and Sulfuric acid to extract the valuable minerals from deposits of Black Mica and store them in an ionized form. In fact, this process is a point of concern for many people who believe that the Black Mica extract adds more acid to the body which is unhealthy. So, is this what constitutes the Adya Clarity Scam?

For those still torn between whether the Adya Clarity Scam is real or unreal, you may want to consider giving it a try. For some, the $150 price you pay for the solution might be well worth it, while some may find it a rip off. Some important points to consider before you make your judgment on the Adya Clarity Scam is the fact that developers of this product indicate clearly that it is only a single step in the water purification process yet promoters state otherwise.

 

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