Miracle Mineral Supplement Scam

English: Logo of the .
English: Logo of the . (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Is Miracle Mineral Supplement Scam?

Even when medical science is on its way to the zenith, many ordinary people are still utterly mislead by various frauds and scams that sweep over the community every once in a while. Most of these are related to health and nutrition, and may often be wrapped in convincing terms like ‘nature’s gifts’ and ‘secret recipes’. One such scam is Miracle Mineral Supplement, MMS in short, which has spread to various parts of the world including Canada, Australia and even Africa. The available evidence is more than sufficient to classify it not only as a scam, but as a serious threat to public health.

MMS, also called Miracle Mineral Solution, was first referred to in the book ‘The Miracle Mineral Solution of the 21st Century’ published by Jim Humble in 2006. Parallel to this, many anecdotal reports showed up, claiming that MMS was a magical product that could cure a variety of diseases like malaria, hepatitis, common colds, H1N1 flu and even HIV and cancer. In fact, MMS is a solution of 28 percent sodium chlorite in distilled water. According to manufacturers, it was necessary to ‘activate’ MMS with some sort of food acid like citric acid before use.

As far as chemistry is concerned, MMS is not much different from industrial bleach. Sodium chlorite, when combined with an acid, produces chlorine dioxide. In reality, this is nothing other than a bleaching agent used for stripping textiles and industrial water treatment. Its oral consumption can obviously lead to serious health issues, as it’s a severe respiratory and eye irritant. If you are lucky, you’ll get away with minor symptoms like stomach pain, vomiting and diarrhea, which are commonly associated with corrosive damage. Other potential risks include reproductive and neurological damages, in addition to dangerously low blood pressures. A larger dose or long-term use is known to reduce the red blood cell count in blood, leading to respiratory arrest and eventual death. Sodium chlorite itself is toxic and may result in fatal kidney failure.

In 2009, an American woman who took MMS against malaria while in Vanuatu fell ill in 15 minutes and died within 12 hours. A Canadian man had to be hospitalized with lethal responses to MMS in 2008. With such incidents, many healthcare professionals started digging into MMS, and came up with shocking results. As a result, public health institutes of many countries, including the US FDA, the UK Food Standards Agency and the Belgian Poison Control Centre issued warnings against MMS. The FDA even advised those who have started using MMS to dispose of the product immediately.

Legal action has been taken against many vendors and promoters of MMS. Yet, the Miracle Mineral Solution scam revives in many parts of the world. Unfortunately, MMS has found its way into Africa, a vast land with less educated people who would soon become desperate victims of this lethal substance. So it’s time for everyone to get together to wipe off MMS from the face of the earth and duly punish the ‘criminals’ behind it.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Incoming search terms:

Is Aqua Chi Scam?

Nodularin
Nodularin (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The modern market is so full of scams that it’s really hard to separate truth from fraud. While some products are just innocent white elephants, others may pose great threats to your health at your own cost. Although foot baths and foot pads are basically harmless, no scientific evidence has managed to support their effectiveness to the slightest degree. Nevertheless, companies like Aqua Chi are still fooling innocent customers for quick cash while selling worthless rubbish like detox foot baths that supposedly help your body ‘detoxify and heal’.

It all started with the researches of Royal Rife, the chauffeur for a wealthy San Diego family, who even faked a PhD from Georgia tech. Apart from an ionized foot bath, he had also worked on ‘Rife Ray’, a radio device intended for destroying germs and viruses without affecting the skin. Lucky for him, a Dr. Arthur Yale undertook the job of promoting the bath through cancer treatment. Fortunately the FDA could sniff the oncoming danger and prosecuted many of the promoters. However, the device revived through pyramid-like multilevel marketing schemes, and has now reappeared through Aqua Chi and many other famous healthcare companies.

Foot baths from Aqua Chi are available in different models, focusing on individuals as well as spas, salons and alternative health practitioners. They are marketed through Wellspring Team Inc. Aqua Chi tries to convince buyers that these foot baths can cure literally hundreds of diseases, including kidney failure, arthritis, limb paralysis, heavy metal poisoning and even autism and menopause. Humorously, one testimonial was based on a person who fell off a roof and recovered through the foot bath. According to Aqua Chi, the device produces positive and negative ions which ‘resonate through the body’ and ‘stimulate body cells’. With the resulting re-balancing of cellular energy, toxins are liberated and excreted through 2000 pores in the soles of the feet.

Anyone with basic medical knowledge knows that toxins are processed by the liver and kidneys to be excreted with urine. In short, this just shatters the very foundation of Aqua Chi’s claims. The company has gone to such lengths to claim that once you immerse your feet in the bath, the water changes color due to the release of toxins. In reality, this has nothing to do with toxins; rust in the metal electrodes is solely responsible. Laboratory tests on water samples taken after treatment sessions have clearly depicted the presence of rust, with no trace of other toxins or parasites. Similarly, color changes in foot pads are accomplished through chemical coatings that change color upon contact with water, which is a major constituent in human sweat too.

Even with such contradictions as clear as day, Aqua Chi doesn’t seem to give up yet. Elaborate testimonials, reports from non-existent doctors and seemingly genuine tests done using unheard-of instruments are still keeping the company on its feet, just for the sake of a few more bucks. Accordingly it’s better to look at all this in a skeptical point of view, and brace yourself against the huge Aqua Chi scam.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Incoming search terms:

David Wolfe Scam

Cover of "Superfoods: The Food and Medici...
Cover via Amazon

In the modern world of competition, scams are everywhere. The latest trend is the appearance of scammers as missionaries and gurus dedicating themselves for the well-being of the world. Over the past few years, David Wolfe has become the center of heated arguments and controversies in the field of health and human nutrition. While thousands of followers honor him as a nutrition guru working to make the world a better place, many others reject him as another regular salesman trying to make more money through innocent people seeking better health and nutrition.
David Wolfe claims himself to be a leading expert on human nutrition and raw foods. Both of his parents were doctors, which is said to have aroused his desire for good health. Currently he is the proprietor of SunFood, a company focusing on such things as “super foods” and “healthiest foods in the world”. It sells everything related to raw foods, such as some food items which actually offer great health benefits but were very difficult to purchase before. David is also an author, some of whose popular books include the SunFood Diet, Superfoods and Eating for Beauty. Being a skillful speaker, he conducts nutrition lectures which are extremely popular on television and the internet.

David Wolfe recommends a vegan diet, based solely on raw vegetables and fruits. His opinion is that this is the natural diet meant for mankind by nature. He claims that this can create amazing effects on one’s health, accompanied by natural healing powers and an immediate sense of bodily wellness. In fact, medical science has brought forth indisputable facts relating unhealthy diet and lifestyle with many of the worst health issues. With so many people seeking treatment for lifestyle conditions and alternatives to a healthier lifestyle, the fame of David Wolfe’s concepts should come as no surprise.

Meanwhile, there are some serious accusations against this raw vegan food concept, which are collectively called “David Wolfe Scam”. The main scientific argument is that vital nutrients like vitamin D, vitamin B12 and certain amino acids are unavailable in plant foods. Thus, a vegan may be easily victimized by nutritional imbalances. Besides, the vegan concept is nothing new; it has been available in Eastern philosophy for centuries, mainly in countries like India. David’s company SunFood is another suspicious factor, as his efforts may merely lie in the direction of personal profits via increased sales and elevated publicity through books and lectures. Some critics have gone to such lengths as to call him “a wolfe in vegan clothing”.

Accordingly it’s obvious that there are many points and counterpoints regarding the genuineness of David Wolfe’s actions and motives. While it’s true that a vegan diet may work miracles with human health, we don’t need a David Wolfe—or anyone else, for that matter—to elaborate on that fact. Nevertheless, the wise thing to do is to carefully analyze David’s concepts and implement them to a certain extent while showing him the due respect, without considering him as a guru or a missionary sent by God.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Incoming search terms: